Andy Heins: 8 Random things I love about my taildragger

Can it be? Another guy who loves his taildragger? You bet! Thanks to Andy Heins for sending in his 8 random things he loves above his Waco. Andy Heins is based at Moraine Airpark, Dayton, Ohio where we had our 2010 and 2011 Lady Taildraggers Fly-in and flies a 1935 Waco YKC-S. This is one incredible Waco and everything he says is 110% true. I wish I had a picture of the roll down windows he mentions – I did a double-take when I saw those windows a couple years ago when Andy took me around the patch. #1 It’s a biplane! #2 It has a radial engine that drips oil everywhere, smokes when started, and sounds cool. #3 The windows roll down! #4 It has big steering wheels! #5 I can carry 4 people, full fuel, and a huge amount of luggage/tents/sleeping bags and still get in and out short. #6 It has a lot of pump appeal. #7 It has a tremendous “zoom” factor when doing a fly-by! #8 Never had anyone not enjoy a ride!    ...

Historical photos from the Robert Keith Armstrong collection

It’s impossible to love taildraggers and not be enamored with the history of aviation. How can you swoon over a Super Cub or an RV8 or a Rans S7 and not be in awe of the granddaddies that trekked the way for what we’re flying today? Even though I jumped “belly down” into the world of aviation when I was 19 (a few sky dives) no one in my family had any interest in flying. There are others though, like Robert Keith Armstrong, who live their entire lives immersed in this wonderful world. Robert’s father, Lt Col Clement H Armstrong, was known in the general aviation world for his lifelong love of  flying, the remarkable aircraft he flew, and his award winning Classic & Vintage restorations at Oshkosh. “Thanks” to Robert for letting me share some photos from his remarkable collection. With AirVenture 2012 coming up soon I’m wondering what I’ll be lucky enough to find in the rows of antique, vintage & classic aircraft. * * * * * * * * * * * Thanks for sharing Robert!  ...

Susan Theodorelos’ “Thursday Adventure”

Susan and Andy are two of the most passionate aviators I know and they KNOW aviators from one end of this country to the other. Heck, make that around the world!! You’ll agree after reading Susan’s story …. I’m getting too old to stay up til midnight and get up at 0330 to catch a 0530 flight to Charlotte, NC! All that said… we headed out Thursday morning on a grand adventure to inspect and possibly purchase a Cessna 170A for our friends from Germany. A zillion phone calls, wire transfers, last minute changes in plans later… we were finally on our way. Andy, Brad and I… I was along as Navigator but mostly for the ride and adventure! We non-rev’d on the “company jet” and landed in Charlotte about 7 am after a great flight with a good friend as Captain! We were met by the owner/seller of the 170, had a nice visit on the 30-45 minute ride out to Lincoln County Airport and found out that we knew a lot of the same people! Steve & Tina Thomas, Doug Parsons and a few others I don’t recall at the moment. Once at the airport, Brad set about inspecting the aircraft… As soon as that was accomplished, Andy went for a test flight with Rick while Brad perused the paperwork…. After the test flight, we left Brad and Rick to discuss business and were standing outside when I heard that distinctive sound and looked up and said… “Andy… a Custom Cabin in the pattern!” Sure enough…. Bob Perkins and his wife Barbara landed and as they taxied up we walked over to the plane and Andy said… “I’m with the FAA and I’d like to see your paperwork…” Bob had this puzzled look on his face like… “I know this guy….but he’s not supposed to be here!” And then it finally hit and we all simultaneously said… “What are you doing here?” What a great treat to see the AGC-8 looking spiffy as ever and have a great visit with Bob and Barbara! We unfortunately had to decline their kind invitation to visit with them at their strip just a few miles away — but we knew we were facing a long trip home and needed to get on the way. We will be back tho!!! We felt badly for Rick as you could see in his face he hated to part with his beautiful 170 — but we loaded up and promised to see each other soon. I curled up in the back seat with my nifty iPad2 complete with nifty Nav programs while Andy and Brad flipped a coin for left seat! We started the long climb up to 8500ft to clear the mountains… (I say that with tongue in cheek as they really are more like hills for someone like me who used to live on the West Coast!) Anyway – we finally leveled off and thankfully it was MUCH cooler at altitude than it was back at Lincoln County Airport! I actually got a bit chilly up there! But the air was smooth and starting to clear as the weak cold front had passed through earlier. The scenery was beautiful… (if you look past the strip mining) – Eventually, we managed to clear the “mountains” and started a slow decent back down … and I finally convinced my “drivers” to make a stop at Portsmouth, Ohio… The winds aloft made our trip a bit longer than we wanted so it was great to get out and stretch a bit…. I kept the new owners up to date with emailed photos of our trip. Topped off with some fuel and we were on our way for the last 45 minutes of the “Adventure”. We finally landed at I73 and it was great to be back home… 98C is now tucked in the hangar at Moraine waiting for her new owners to arrive and have a good look and take a spin around the patch. The plan is to leave the plane here for the summer and attend some fly-ins with us — then crate her up for the trip to Germany this fall. While I hate to see another plane go across the pond… she will have great new owners who will love and take care of her with promises of rides for us when we venture over to visit! Susan Theodorelos...

Allison Driver     (Tennessee)

Allison Driver (Tennessee)

Allison Driver is based at (KMBT), Murfreesboro Municipal Airport, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. My name is Allison. I’m fourteen and I live in Murfreesboro, TN. I have been flying for most of my life. My grandfather, Ernest Betancourt, bought a Citabria ten years ago with the intention of teaching my sister and me to fly. My grandad has his CFI ratings. He recently started teaching me and already I have ten hours of formal instruction. My grandad used to have a Mooney but traded it for a Waco. Personally, I enjoy flying the Waco and Citabria better. I’m super excited about getting my license!...

Lady Taildraggers Fly-Low Magazine Cover

Hey girls, we made the cover of the March 2011 Fly-Low Magazine which is being mailed out this week!!! If you were at our lady taildraggers fly-in last August you’ll remember this fun flight – you may have even been in one of the other 6 or 7 (or was it 8?) taildraggers flying formation that Saturday night.  Me, I’m the one hopping a ride in this beautiful Great Lakes biplane taking the picture of Tina & Steve Thomas’ gorgeous Cabin Waco and Steve Given’s Waco RNF. In my picture, Susan was flying her Waco RNF just ahead of Steve! Ralph from Fly-Low Magazine tells me the limitation in width wasn’t wide enough to catch the third airplane. Sorry Susan. 🙁 The magazine cover says our story is on page 34 so pick up a Fly-Low Magazine at an airport near you later this week and check it out!!...

I GOT TO FLY THE RNF!!! (Susan Theodorelos)

Susan Theodorelos wrote up a fun little story about her Saturday aviation adventures. Thanks for sharing with us Susan. Sure was fun finally bumping into you and ALL your friends!  Judy Got up yesterday morning…. met Brad down at the airport and hopped in the Grumman (yeah… I know…) and flew up to Urbana for breakfast to meet Daun and Kathy (visiting from Canada, eh?) who had already flown up in the Champ. Gorgeous day to fly… amazing… with a radio you can fly over places I normally don’t get to go with the Waco RNF…. About 10 miles out of Urbana I get a text message.. my dear friend Judy and her husband Boyd are there as well in their Champ! (L-R) Judy Birchler, Kathy Boyko, Susan Theodorelos We settle in for a nice breakfast and look up to see a beautiful 170 taxi in… hmmm… looks really familiar! Seems great minds think alike as George Wilford and his son Brian had the same idea… $100.00 pancakes! Had a nice flight home… zipping past the Champ … and then decided to try and finish the annual on the RNF. The weather was cooperating… we pulled the old girl out to warm up the engine before the compression check… Ready for the first start of the season…. Ahhhh…. the smell of mineral oil in the afternoon! Compression went swimmingly with all cylinders above 74! Me likey! We had to fix the fuel shut off — it had been leaking…. got that accomplished. The sun was starting to sink as we finished buttoning her back up …. I just couldn’t stand it… so I jumped in, Andy propped her and we were off… * Curing my altitude deprivation sickness…. Complete with escorts Andy and Brad in the Champ and Kathy and Daun in the 172. Gorgeous night to fly…. It is amazing how 20 minutes in your plane can put the world back into perspective…. but with the sun just about to dip below the horizon… it was time to land… It was a GREAT day  As the rain, sleet and thunderstorms move in this morning… I might just survive until the next warm, sunny day! Susan Theodorelos WacoRNF...

Brooke Parsons     (Ohio)

Brooke Parsons (Ohio)

Student pilot Brooke Parsons is based at (5D6) Parsons Airport, Carrollton, Ohio. I live on a family airport. My dad, uncle, and grandfather all own airplanes. I have been flying since I was 2 weeks old. Last year when I was 14 I started to take more and more interest in flying so my dad got me started with a few books. My trainers are my dad, and grandpa Lee Parsons. He was so excited for me to start that he ordered me cushions because I can’t quite reach the pedals of the Cessna 140 yet. My total hours of flying so far are about 6. The 140 is currently out of service but my dad and I work on it as much as possible. Every year at the Waco Fly-in I am so amazed at the beauty of flying. It is such a wonderful thing. When I am up in the sky with the sun setting, I feel like nothing is impossible. I look forward each year to going to the Waco Fly-in and it is my dream to fly a Waco by myself in there someday. For all of those out there who have a fear of flying I say try it, you will NOT regret it! We have a 1934 Waco YKC and a 1946 Cessna 140. I will soon be soloing in the Cessna 140 and hope to fly the Waco someday all over the world =) Brooke Parsons...

Lorraine Morris    (Illinois)

Lorraine Morris (Illinois)

Lorraine Morris is based at Poplar Grove Airport (C77), Poplar Grove, Illinois. I started flying in 1980 and started flying taildraggers in 1987 when I met my husband.  He had a 1950 Cessna 140A that he had learned to fly in, so he taught me to fly again (in the 140A) after not flying for 5 years before I met him. We have kept the 140A and I think I will go before it goes as it has been in the family since 1968, but other taildraggers have come and gone, including a bunch of Cessna 140s, a 150 taildragger conversion, a Spartan Executive (Ken’s Mistress), a Commonwealth Skyranger, and a Culver Cadet. All of these we bought as some form of basket case and fixed up or restored to flying condition. We are working on another Cessna 150 tailwheel conversion right now as that is the plane I had a lot of fun with.  The early 150s with the straight tail and straight back are the best when converted using Cessna 140 gear. I fly the B-777 for United right now, and started an interior business about 15 years ago.  I sew and install complete interiors for people, preferably in old airplanes.  My husband Ken is an A&P and IA so between the two of us we do lots of complete restorations for ourselves and others. We got our DC-3 type ratings, and that also allows us to deliver all kinds of planes all over the US.  I have to say it is always a team effort! Thanks for the great website! Lorraine Morris...

Herb Stachler (by Susan Theodorelos)

Sometimes things happen in life that, at first glance, start out “normal” and you then realize, how truly special they are!   We had the good fortune, through friends, to meet “Lil Herbie” — or Herb Stachler who, at 92 years old, looks and acts more like someone in his 70’s!  We met at our hangar as Sunday was the day we would take Herbie for rides in the Wacos.  We planned to take him for a ride in Andy’s cabin as it is much easier to get in and out. We spent probably an hour before listening to stories Herbie was telling us that are nothing short of remarkable. Herbie flew P47’s in the 366th Fighter Group.  He spoke very fondly of the P47 — despite its penchant for guzzling fuel (100 gals per hour in normal cruise) with only 400 gallons on board.  He spoke of how their limited fuel range allowed them to escort the “heavies” (B17’s) out over the English Channel and in to France before having to turn back.  It was chilling to hear him tell how they would radio the pilots in the B17’s that they were starting to get low on fuel and needed to turn back.  The B17 pilots would always ask — “Stay just a little longer please?” as everyone saw the swarm of German fighter planes waiting up at higher altitude a little further along.  But eventually, Herbie and his squadron mates could wait no longer, low on fuel they had to turn back.  He said you could hear the radios light up with the B17’s chattering about the German Fighters beginning their runs.  There was a chill in his voice and a few cracks as he told this story.  “There were so many losses; those boys really took a beating.”  Herbie soon turned the conversation to a bit more light-hearted topics about the P47. He told of a time when he was flying recon and relaying messages over the English Channel and was up at about 30K feet when he thought, “Let’s see how fast I can get this thing going…”  He did a split S and nosed over the P47 and reached over 600 mph!  He said fought like hell to pull it out of the dive, with a mental note not to do that again.   His squadron was flying cover over the beach at D-Day +5 and he was “Tail End Charlie”.  “I was flying along at the back and looking in amazement at all the ships in the Channel, when I heard this ‘clink, clink, CLINK!”  Sure enough — just about the time he heard the squadron leader say, “Break away – you’ve got a ‘Gerry’ on your tail!”, he said the cockpit was filled with bits of shrapnel from a 20mm shell that had burst into the cockpit.  Covered in fluid, Herbie said, “I knew I wasn’t hit because I didn’t hurt, but I was sitting on top of the fuel tank and I reached down got some on my fingers to smell to make sure it wasn’t gas!”  Luckily, (maybe) it was hydraulic fluid.  He had just heard that the allies had captured an airfield and he headed that direction, unsure whether they “really” had captured the field or if it could even be used. Heck, he wasn’t even sure he was landing at the correct field, but without flaps or brakes, and a shot up plane he needed to land somewhere, now!  He managed to get her down and stopped before running off the end of the runway.  The maintenance crews quickly replaced the engine on his ship, and Herbie took her up to do “slow time” as he called it when at about 10K feet, the engine quit.  “It finally started running again after about losing 5000ft and I landed.  They didn’t have time to trouble shoot so they just yanked that engine off and put another one on!”  Herbie told meeting some of the Glider pilots that managed to survive the invasion.  “They told me they were never getting in another airplane without an engine!”  Herbie gave rides to the guys in his ship – but putting them in the seat and sitting on top of them! But time came for him to get back to the action so he took off from that little air strip and headed back to his squadron.   Although not completely verified, he said, “Story is I was the first Allied Plane to land in France and fly back out after the invasion began.” We could have sat and listened to Herbie’s stories for hours, but the primary objective of our mission was to give him a ride in the Wacos.  Herbie did not fly after the war.  He said he flew a little bit when people gave him rides, but, like a lot of WWII veterans, he got busy with working and raising his family (10 children!)  So a ride in the Waco was a big excitement for him. He had no trouble at all getting up on the wing of the Cabin and he and Andy took off with me in the RNF on their tail.  We joined up and flew a formation pass down the runway for Herbie.  Andy said he was laughing and enjoying the ride immensely.  Andy took him over UD’s Welcome Stadium.  Herbie had been there the night before as a friend of his just turned 90 and they honored his friend at the football game as a former alum.  They flew over Carillon Park and then back to the airport.  I had landed before Andy and kept the RNF running juuuust in case Herbie wanted to go for a ride. He had spoken so fondly of his Stearman training in Primary Flight school at the start of the war I wanted to give him every opportunity to go for a ride. Andy asked him before he even got out of the Cabin, “You want to go for a ride in the RNF?”  To which Herbie responded, “Heck yes!”  Andy and our friend Mike went off to see if they could find a box for Herbie to stand on to help him on the wing, but they looked over and Herbie was already about to climb on the wing — so they rushed back over to help him in but he was halfway up the wing and surely didn’t need any help from us!  We got him buckled in and despite the chill in the air and the wind sitting behind the spinning prop — he was ready to go! We taxied out and I did my pre-flight checks and said, “Are you ready Herbie?”  And he came back over the intercom — “Oh YES!  Let’s go!” I pushed the throttle forward and the Warner kicked to life and we were off in about 200 feet.  We came back around and made a pass down the runway and Herbie was waving at everyone on the ground.  After we pulled back up to altitude, I just sat and listened to Herbie “oooh and ahhh” and watched him take pictures as we flew over the surrounding area.  I could have stayed up there all day with him, but I’ve been up front in my plane on a cool day and I didn’t want him to get chilled to the bone.  So we came back around and set up for landing…. the wind was rather squirrely — but I slipped the plane in and thankfully pulled off a smooth landing.  As we taxied back, Herbie said, “Oh I can’t thank you enough for this!  I haven’t been up in an open cockpit biplane since my primary training in 1943!”  I had tears in my eyes as I told him, “Herbie, it was my honor and such a privilege to take you for a ride and you can be my co-pilot anytime!”  As I pulled up to the hangar and shut the engine down, Andy asked him, “So how’d she do?” Herbie replied, “She did a great job!” Andy asked him if I was ready for a P47 and we all laughed when he said, “In time!” Needless to say — it was also Herbie’s first time riding with a female pilot!  I’m sooo lucky!! Getting in the front cockpit of the RNF can be awkward — getting out even more so — but Herbie with his short stature (he had to stand on his tiptoes to make the height requirements to fly!) and being so nimble — he had no troubles at all getting out of the RNF.  As soon as I got out, he came up and gave me a big hug saying again how much he loved being out in the air again in an airplane.  We took lots of pictures and in front of the planes and the hangar for him to share with his buddies.  Needless to say, this is a flight I will never forget.  We invited Herbie to come back on Tuesday night (Airport night!) to meet more of our friends and tell more stories! Herbie arrived about 6 pm and our usual Airport Night group of 17 people were there waiting to meet Herb Stachler!  Just about the time Herbie arrived, brother Pete Heins arrived with the CRG!  Herb was really amazed by that Waco!   It was to be a special night because Herbie brought his dress uniform, leather flying jacket, helmet, goggles and gloves for us all to see!  Herbie graciously answered all our questions about flying the P47 and the exciting (heck, downright scary) things he experienced.  He recounted stories about the Battle of the Bulge and the German Tiger tanks which were darn near impossible to stop.   Herbie’s flight jacket was amazing.  One of the guys in his squadron painted his P47 on the back and he had the markings for all the fighter sweeps, and bomb runs he had made along with markings for the tanks, trucks, and planes he had taken out.  There was even what looked like a barn!  Herbie told us how he and another pilot had been sent in on a mission to destroy an ammo depot.  “I guess we did a pretty good job because we got the Distinguished Flying Cross for that mission!”  Everyone around the table was slack-jawed in amazement.  Herbie then reached inside his leather jacket and pulled out an envelope containing about four or five passport photos.  “We carried these in case we were shot down and were lucky enough to picked up by the Underground, then they could make passports for us to help get us out of enemy territory.”  He also had a little tin containing some of the shrapnel from that 20mm shell that invaded his cockpit and his little button compass that pilots would sew on their coats.   Another amazing award Herbie had decorating his dress uniform is the Croix de guerre which may either be bestowed as a unit award or to individuals who distinguish themselves by acts of heroism involving combat with enemy forces. For the unit decoration of the Croix de guerre, a fourragère or aiguillette is awarded which is suspended from the shoulder of an individual’s uniform.  Herbie’s unit was presented this award by the Belgians for their acts during the Battle of the Bulge.  It was truly breath-taking to be sitting there listening and seeing all this history.  Thankfully, our friends John and Linda LeBarre had set up their video camera and about an hour and a half of the conversation is recorded. Our friend Brad had been busily cooking up a fabulous grilled dinner and we all sat down and enjoyed a great meal with all the Wacos as a backdrop.  Herbie has said he will come back to visit and fly with us again.  How lucky are we? I may have confused some of the facts about his stories — but if you want to read more about Herbie — here is a link:http://pages.prodigy.net/rebeljack/Herbie-and-others.html...

Susan & Andy’s flying adventure to Brodhead 2010!

Susan Theodorelos and Andy Heins flew the Waco to Brodhead, WI for the big fly-in Sept. 9 – 12.  Thanks for sharing your fun trip with us, Susan! “We flew a 1935 Waco YKC-S NC14620 –  My hubby’s plane … although I’m not checked out in the plane — I do a lot of the flying from point A to point B!  It is a great old bird — and it’s pretty much — “”if you can get it through the door you can take it with you!””  She is a lot of fun to fly — big old steering wheels and windows that roll down – which we affectionately call our “”Thermostats””.  She’s powered with a 275 Jacobs engine and carries 70 gallons of gas and 5 gallons of oil!  The FBO’s LOVE to see us taxi in for gas!  We flight plan a fuel burn of 16 g/ph… ugh!  But the “”fun factor”” really out weighs the fuel cost!” Susan loaded up and ready to go! “We pushed the Cabin out of the hangar about 8 am on Thursday morning to skies so blue and air so nice and crisp, it was unbelievable!  Normally, riding in the Waco cabin in summer weather can be like a sweat lodge experience…but today was going to be just lovely!  After filling up with fuel, we rumbled down 26 and were on our way! We left from  Moraine Airpark (I73) VFR direct to Koerner’s Aviation (3KK) just across the Indiana border in Illinois.  Stopping there is like taking a step back in time.  N/S & E/W grass runways and a big old hangar straight out of the late 20’s! Beautiful colors We popped up to about 4500 MSL to stay clear of Muncie airspace, and I looked down at the GPS and we both cringed…. 88mph GS??  Oh boy — this is gonna be a while! No Land-Speed Records! What I did next was probably hateful to some but — I pulled out my iPhone and checked the winds and we decided that after we cleared Muncie we would drop back down to 2500-3000 MSL to see if we could make a bit more speed there.   Ran that one dry! I was sitting with my head on my hand, elbow propped on the window sill of the cabin just enjoying the view and kaleidoscope of colors when the engine coughed… I’M AWAKE!  Someone forgot to add in a couple notches of mixture before we descended back down! That always gets your attention!  Oddly enough, we picked up a good 20mph GS at the lower altitude … ahhh…much better… at least the cars weren’t passing us at this point!   Wabash River   The skies were clear as a bell and you could see forever.  We passed over the Wabash River and acres and acres of fields that splashed all sorts of colors from deep green to bright yellows.  I was at the controls, air was smooth as glass, just a couple fingers holding the wheel… and you sometimes have to pinch yourself — “”Am I REALLY this lucky??”” Kankakee River It wasn’t long before we could make out Greater Kankakee Airport (KIKK) in the distance…and just beyond — the familiar old hangar of Koerners!   Koerner’s Hangar Andy took over for landing the big, old beast and I snapped a few more photos before landing. Home of Koerner Aviation After visiting with Steve and Roger for a bit — catching up on the “”goins on”” for the past several months, we topped off with fuel and rumbled down 26 again.  Andy climbed up and turned right and pointed the nose of the old girl back around for a “”So Long”” pass down the runway… We climbed back up to 3000 MSL and toddled along… it was hard to imagine we hadn’t seen another plane during the 2 hours to Koerner’s…it was too beautiful NOT to fly! Just as we got skirted around the Class B airspace of Chicago and started the turn north to Poplar Grove we passed over a corn field which we originally though was  a maze…but a closer look showed this was a tribute to the Armed Forces with a soldier holding a rifle with “”America”” written next to his right shoulder — just below in another field was a P-51 carved out of the corn!  Just beautiful and worth a turn back for a photo! Corn Maze As we turned back north again, the sky was looking rather ominous and dark to the Northwest…””Hmmm…wonder what that is?””  So I did it again, I fished out the iPhone and pulled up the radar… “”Oh…THAT is what that is…”” Seems a line of storms was brewing and building north of our ultimate destination, so we kept a wary eye on it as we toddled north and dropped down in to Poplar Grove!   Fuzzy welcome from Carson at Poplar Grove! If you’ve never been to Poplar Grove, you owe yourself  a trip to see Steve and Tina Thomas — two of the nicest people you would ever want to meet.  You know Tina from this website – -she’s a fantastic pilot logging oodles of hours in her Bird Biplane, the Waco SRE, and a Beech 18!  I am in awe of her talent!  Anyway – we land and have a great time catching up with them since it had only been about 3 or 4 weeks since we were all at the LLT fly-in!  We hopped into town for a quick bit of lunch and decided we should motor on to C37 to secure our favorite spot to camp. So we climbed into the Waco and off we went for the short 20 min flight to Brodhead!  It is always exciting to see the airport come into view.  This is truly one of the best antique fly-ins out there! Another great airport with a long, lighted E/W grass runway and two crossing runways!  The entire airport is hugely devoted to antique airplanes and you never know what treat you will find peeking in the hangars there!” Parked at Brodhead and ready for the fun! On a good weather weekend, you’ll see 300-400 airplanes on the field…and not your normal stuff either!  And the best part, everyone flies from sun up to sun down!  Then the bonfire and lie swapping starts!  Great food and hot showers on the field.  And the one last chance to see all our old flying buddies before the doldrums of winter sets in! The Waco line-up! We pushed the Cabin into her old familiar spot next to the Lockheed, Beech 18, Cessna Airmaster, Stinson Detroiter and a gaggle of 195’s!  We hadn’t been there very long before we saw the Waco 10 with an OX5 engine take to the skies hopping rides… “”Ahhhh… welcome to Brodhead!”” Stay tuned for the next installment … don’t want to make this too long… Judy will never get this loaded on the website!”...

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