Monica Delgado     (Columbia)

Monica Delgado (Columbia)

Monica Delgado is based at SKCL, Alfonso Bonilla Aragón International Airport, Palmira, Colombia. I like to fly SuperCub and C185. I am happy to find a community that likes to fly taildraggers. It’s great to know other woman that like the same as me.  ...

Mary & Dennis Nolan, Married 20 April, 2013

Mary & Dennis Nolan, Married 20 April, 2013

Thank you to Mary Nolan for kicking off our “Flying High Wedding” series so beautifully. Enjoy the story of Mary & Dennis Nolan’s airborne wedding in a Beech 18 — somewhere over Tennessee! Dennis Nolan and I were married on 20 April, 2013 in a Beech-18. We met the year prior because many of our friends believed our backgrounds were a perfect match. Dennis has flown Bonanzas most of his life along with helicopters. His history of racing sprint cars and loving Harley Davidson motorcycles paralleled my career of T-6 racing at Reno, airshow performing, enjoying riding my own Harley plus a lifetime of civilian, USAF and Fedex flying. We wanted to be married in the air, so we checked into renting a King Air. It proved to be very expensive and rather tame. I called Jim Slocum and asked if he still had “Ursula”, his Beech-18 he had given me the privilege of flying at one of their wonderful fly-days. ‘No, but I know were to find it’ was his answer. He even humbly agreed to fly it during our wedding. On the morning of the wedding after a brief turn back due to a cargo door problem, Jim, Val, Aubie and Lesley Pearman landed ‘in the Chapel’ at Charles Baker Airport. Val and Lesley had decorated the Beech with roses and ribbon, ‘she’ was stunning. Our airport friends decided to have their Spring Airport Day and help celebrate our day so lots of airplanes were beautifully parked on the ramp including our F-33 Bonanza and our wedding present…a Decathalon! The hangar was decorated with tulips and Checker Flag linen. Our 200 guests arrived and watched a happy couple take off in an airplane full of pilots, even the preacher! Our wedding party joined us in the air in two immaculate Howards and after we landed a Supercub flew over dropping rose petals…..Our guests were treated to wonderful food and lots of airplane rides…truly a magical Day. If you were married aloft or married at an airport, or know someone who was, we’d love to share your story. Submit at Flying High Weddings!...

Karen Croskell: Blackhawk Rotor wash

Karen Croskell: Blackhawk Rotor wash

Very few updates from our pilots provide the kind of real life learning experiences as this one. Thanks, Karen, for telling your story and reminding us of the destructive forces possible with rotor-wash and prop-wash. Glad you’re both OK. Karen Croskell is based at CO15, Kelly Air Park, Elbert, Colorado. Jan 29, 2014 I had just soloed my student (I was a contract CFI for Doss Aviation USAF student prescreen). I was required to make the flight back to Pueblo from Butts Army base which is now a massive helicopter base. The tower cleared me for takeoff behind a Blackhawk but I was just a bit too close. We hit the rotor-wash at about 150′ after takeoff. The left wing hit but I kept it flying, then it hit the nose and blew off the engine. The right gear hit and catapulted us into the air and tumbled, the canopy shattered at some point, my student’s headset was 150′ from the aircraft. We ended up trapped upside down. Miraculously we both walked away with a few bruises and I got 3 stitches in my forehead! My student is now in training at the USAF to fly even bigger planes. I am now retired and get to just fly for me and enjoy our Super Cub! As usual my life is quite an adventure! The good news is we are signing up for the LLT fly-in because I’m now retired from “commercial” flying. See you at the LLT flyin!!! Fly safe! Karen Croskell Colorado...

A Supercub Blast From The Past!

A Supercub Blast From The Past!

A count several years ago on LadiesLoveTaildraggers showed the Supercub was the number one airplane lady taildragger pilots buy and fly. I’m not so sure those numbers would hold up today but it’s time to bring that fun little video back anyway. BTW, that’s Windy flying her PA-12 FAT Cub in the video and the cheeky-cowled Cubs in the pictures are Sport Cubs – close enough! Lot and lots of lady taildragger Supercub lovers have joined since that video was posted – here are just a few....

Lisa Martin     (Montana)

Lisa Martin (Montana)

An update from Lisa Martin! Lisa and husband John have relocated from Wyoming to Montana. I got my private license in 1989 while 7 1/2 months pregnant with my oldest child. The family priority slowed my flying some, although my husband and I owned and operated our own aviation business in Montana spraying and doing other surveys with airplanes and helicopters. In 2003, we moved to Wyoming and my husband went to work for Sky Aviation. As my boys grew up and I had some more time to fly, I added on an instrument rating in about 2006. We owned a C180 at that time (previously we owned a 7GCBC and an Aeronca Champ). When my boys both graduated and moved on, I poured myself into getting a commercial rating with a Piper Comanche. Soon as I got that rating we sold it to return to the fun and spot-on convenience of taildragger flying. Bought our 150 hp Super Cub in Oct of 2010 and are having so much fun just bee-boppin’ around! I added a commercial glider rating in 2011. Spent a week with Wayne Handley in Groveland, CA doing unusual attitude recovery in an extra 300 the spring of 2012. We live a pretty eclectic, empty-nester life lately.My husband flies helicopters doing utility work for a living. I travel with him as his fuel truck driver. We spent last winter in Coeur d’Alene, ID (2012-13), the summer of 2013 in Moab, UT on a BLM wildland fire helitack team, the Fall of 2013 adding a Flight Instructor Certificate to my wallet and flying around the Flathead Valley on snow skis, and next will be heading back to north central Idaho to do Big Game surveys. We’re always looking forward to backcountry flying and camping trips when not working. Schafer’s Meadow was our home away from home when we lived in Cut Bank, MT and is our fav MT backcountry strip. I am very excited to get into Schafer’s this winter on skis and do some snowshoeing. It was a big encouragement to me to meet some of you ladies at Smiley Creek a few years ago. I am anxious to meet more of you and see those of you I know again (even though my life does not lend itself to making plans for more than the day at hand)! Father’s Day Fly-in from Lisa Lisa’s Search for Musselshell River Flooding Mexican Mountain Utah Backcountry...

Flying’s like a trip to the Mall…..says Bill Tracy

Flying’s like a trip to the Mall…..says Bill Tracy

This was posted on our LadiesLoveTaildraggers Facebook group and is just too good not to share on the website. “Flying’s like a trip to the mall” says Bill Tracy and I think you just may agree. Chill out people, it’s an analogy – there’s more to this than the title. Reprinted with Bill’s permission. Yesterday I spent some time talking to Windy throwing darts at our respective wall charts to see where our travels might lead to this coming summer. Somewhere we mentioned the fact that no one can understand how we can fly a 100 miles and make 40 stops. Well last night while I couldn’t sleep I came up with what sounded to me like a very good analogy for all you ladies on how to make your flying more fun. Think of it like a trip to the mall. I know you ladies can’t go to the mall and visit just one store. Airports are like stores. If someone didn’t want you to stop at them they wouldn’t have made them. It’s like stores at the mall, “I don’t need anything, I just want to go in and look”. So as you fly along and see an airport is within say 20 miles you need to check it out. Of course there are several levels on how this all works. First there are the elusive airports/stores that might be off the main street and a bit hard to find or maybe they just no longer exist but that don’t mean that you don’t still take a look to see if you can find them. Now some are like window shopping. You fly over at 500 feet and can see there is nothing of interest so you just do a fly by. Next are the stores that you at least need to stick your head in the door. These are the airports that have a couple of T hangers and you need to at least get down to 50 feet to see in the hangers. Now if you see something in the hangers it’s like visiting the antique store. You just have to stop and go in and look around – this is where you find all the hidden treasures. Then there are the places that have the really good bargains and you can kill the whole afternoon visiting. This is where you find the old guy that is so happy that you stopped that he invites you into his hanger offers you a can of pop and shows you his old champ or T craft that obviously hasn’t flown for a couple of years but he has plenty of how he just rebuilt it (25 years ago) and of the places that he has been and how maybe next week he will get it out and go flying again. Then there is the super store where you find the courtesy car and get to go into town for some ice cream. The short version of this is Wife leaves the house at 10AM to get a loaf of bread. Comes home at 5PM with a new pair of shoes that she swears were 50% off puts them in the closet with the other 25 pair that she has never wore and says by the way I was to busy today to get to the store for bread guess we will have to go out for supper tonight. LADIES NEXT TIME YOU GET THE URGE TO GO SHOPPING, FLY TO A NEW AIRPORT INSTEAD HERS – HIS – OTHERS...

Low and (very) Slow to Oshkosh, 2011   (Contest Entry #9)

Low and (very) Slow to Oshkosh, 2011 (Contest Entry #9)

Low and (very) Slow to Oshkosh, 2011 by Anne Wright Morning dawned at Ann Arbor, Michigan with a few little puffies in the distance, the Supercub was packed with clothes and camping gear, full fuel, new charts, and a restless desire to launch. An hour later, those little puffies in the distance became a solid 500’ overcast, prompting me to look for the nearest airport. Out my right window was Sturgis, MI, and so with no other traffic, I made a nice quick landing and taxied up to the FBO.  They didn’t even know someone had landed (I love it when I can land before anyone knows I’m there). They were quite friendly and let me hang out until the overcast lifted. An hour later I borrowed the crew car and went into town for lunch.   After waiting it out for three hours, I was on my way again. Boink! went something in my head. Doofus, why didn’t you get fuel while you were there?  I wasn’t thinking about fuel as I had only flown a little over an hour, but I don’t like stopping around Chicago, and I didn’t have enough to get to Poplar Grove. Oh, there’s Valparaiso, they have fuel, so I think I’ll stop there. “Valparaiso traffic, Supercub 85SD, inbound landing.”  “Annie, is that you?”  Boy, was I ever surprised!  I had never stopped there before and knew no-one for miles around.  It turns out it was a friend of mine working with the Collings Foundation, headed out on a photo shoot in their B-24, and VPZ was one of Collings’ stops on their tour.  Since I already determined I would miss the pre-airshow entry to Oshkosh, I stayed for lunch (again) and a visit.   Two hours later, with full fuel, I was on my way northbound.  Landing at Poplar Grove is always a treat, with the beautiful long grass runways and a chance to visit with Tina and Steve Thomas.  After a tour of the grounds, meeting some of the local airport folks, playing with the dogs, and an invitation to stay overnight with Tina and Steve, we enjoyed a beer and burger at a hangar party. Did I mention that Poplar Grove is one of my favorite stops?  The next morning I took off for Oshkosh, landing there early with the light pre-rush traffic. Two days, one overnight, and a lot of fun, for what is normally a 4.5 hour trip!   I forgot to take pictures of that part of the adventure, but I could point out where I was camped from the LLT lunch at the Hilton Inn. It was fun to play a trick on Judy with the guys camped a few spots down from me. They were having a great time, sitting by their Champ and drinking some adult beverages. I stopped by on my way to the LLT lunch, and said that a friend of mine was going to be heading towards my campsite, and would most likely stop and talk about Champs, since she used to own one, but now owns a Rans S-7.  And guess what happened?  Judy stopped by to talk to the Champ guys, and they acted like they knew all about her!  It’s a really small world at Oshkosh! I stopped again at Poplar Grove on the way home to say hi and fuel up, and ended up having lunch with Steve and Tina, and Jim and Jimmie Rollinson.  Jim & his dad Jimmie had flown the Songbird from California for Oshkosh, and are two of the nicest guys. Back at the airport, I had the thrill of sitting right seat in Sky King’s airplane, Songbird III.  Penny flies again!  ...

Weathered In At Pendleton, Oregon  (Contest Entry #8)

Weathered In At Pendleton, Oregon (Contest Entry #8)

Weathered In At Pendleton Oregon Wheat Farmers, Cowboys, Wine, Eclectic Citizens and Colorful History by Victoria Bond In early October of 2008, I was flying my Piper Super Cub back from Yakima Washington returning home towards Salt Lake City, Utah. A storm was forecast between Yakima and Salt Lake, so when I left Yakima I knew that I would need to stop for a night or two.  Since I left late in the afternoon, my plan was to stop in La Grande Oregon. I had been there before and knew there was a great FBO with courtesy cars and that La Grande had many dining and lodging options. However an hour into my flight, I approached Pendleton Oregon, a town 30 minutes prior to my La Grande destination. Since winds were gusty, 12 knots gusting to 18, at both Pendleton and La Grande, and if! stopped, I could avoid flying through the turbulence over the Blue Mountains, I decided to land at Pendleton for the night. I assumed there was not much to Pendleton but that it would serve as a good, safe, overnight stop. The tower controller let me know the choice of runways was mine since the wind was blowing between all 3 of them. My new vortex generators added stability and I was pleased with a non eventful landing in the gusty winds. I taxied to the FBO and Larry helped me fuel the plane and carry my luggage. That was nice! I asked Larry about hotels, good steak restaurants and whether or not I could use the courtesy car overnight (not a common practice). Larry told me the best steak restaurant was Hamley’s but it was on the expensive side and dinner might cost as much as $25. He mentioned there were other steak houses, but that Hamley’s was the premier restaurant in town. I also located a motel 2 blocks from Hamley’s and main street. So I threw my baggage into the vintage brown station wagon, replete with wood sides, and drove down from the sweeping plateau serving as home to the airport, into a valley carved by the Umatilla river. As I drove from the airport, the scenery was unexpected, a contrast of verdant green trees and the river in the valley relative to the sweeping wheat fields on the plateau. I passed large rodeo grounds and passed older buildings and located my motel which had been recently renovated. I checked in, settled down and then walked to dinner. Walking to Hamley’s and crossing a beautiful main street, it appeared that I was revisiting an era of the past. Entering Hamley’s was also quite a surprise. This was not a typical steak restaurant but rather a fabulous renovation of historic buildings turned into a restaurant, wine cellar, bars, and a specialty shopping venue. I walked into a western museum with an historic large wood, mirrored bar, stained glass chandelier, western paintings and a stairway down into a wine cellar.  I sampled their famed drink, a “Sage Brush,” made of course with Pendleton Whiskey and other secret ingredients. I learned that indeed Pendleton Whiskey had been specially blended for the Pendleton Roundup and Rodeo. Pendleton is noted for the oldest and most prestigious roundup and rodeo in the west. This event more than doubles the town’s population for an entire week during the second week of September. To top off the evening, the steak I ordered, the filet mignon, cold smoked over apple wood and grilled with a huckleberry demi-glaze, was the most delicious steak that I have ever enjoyed. This steak dinner was incredible and far exceeded my expectations, especially since I didn’t have any and was just hoping for a good meal and clean room. Returning to the motel, I stopped in the lobby and grabbed some brochures and the manager told me that ifI stayed another day I could possibly take the famed “Underground” tour. I couldn’t image what that might entail. I could also take a tour of the Pendleton Woolen Mills. Since I had my laptop and internet access card, I was able to check weather and make some “Pilot In Command” decisions. I was obviously thinking that if! couldn’t make it all the way to Salt Lake City, why not stay put in this wonderful town and do some more investigation. This had turned into a truly wonderful adventure. A line of storms had turned into an unpredicted large winter storm producing up to 2 feet of snow in Montana. Snow was also falling in Salt Lake in an uninterrupted line of storms from Nevada and Utah into Central Idaho. There would be continued high winds and an icing Airmet in effect between Pendleton and Salt Lake, for at least 24 more hours. Well that made for an easy choice! I’ll tum in and explore Pendleton more tomorrow. I woke up to a crisp cold morning, 23 degrees, but it warmed throughout the day. I wandered back to Hamley’s to visit the western store. Again, the store was another first class operation. The lady that welcomed me to the store began sharing the history of the Hamley brothers, two men who followed the cry of, “Go Out West Young Men” and began a custom saddle business in the 1800’s. The store had life-size bronze statures, custom saddles, belts, boots, and clothing. After visiting the store, I stopped at the coffee shop next door. This is a small town, so the barista welcomed the next person ordering a coffee with a “Hello Bruce.” So I turned and said, “Good morning Bruce” as well. I mentioned I was visiting and would be taking some tours, so he suggested that I go to a gathering spot at 4:30 in the afternoon where locals gather, drink wine and musicians jam. He also introduced me to a lady in the coffee shop named Karen. After he left, Karen asked that if I would be attending the gathering later in the day, could she join me at the gathering. What a pleasant town. Now my day’s calendar was full, a tour of the Pendleton Woolen Mills, a tour of the “Underground”-still had no idea what that would be, and a get together with town locals and musicians at 4:30. The Pendleton Woolen Mill tour was interesting but the Underground tour was again a big surprise. Apparently when the railroad was being built, there were many Chinese laborers in Pendleton. These laborers were not allowed in town after dark at that time, so they lived underground, under the buildings of the town center. We toured these quarters including sleeping, laundry business, opium dens etc. In the late 1800’s and early 1900’s Pendleton had over 18 brothels and over 30 bars. Ranchers and farmers came into town for a good time after they were paid, and patronized the brothel establishments. So our tour switched gears and we were led above ground into a doorway squeezed between two other buildings on main street. We walked up 21 stairs (21 stairs to heaven) and found ourselves in one of the historic brothels. This brothel was everything that one might expect of a brothel. There were parlors with card tables, pianos for entertainment, working rooms and living quarters in the back. There were secret passageways for quick escapes and original photos of the madam. When the brothels were closed in 1953, the owner of this particular building was so embarrassed that he placed cement blocks at the entrance. This building remained sealed for 40 years until 1990 when he died. The building has now been donated to the historical society and is part of the Pendleton “Underground” tour. Amazing and Unexpected! Now I have just time to freshen up and meet my new friends at the locals gathering spot. Musicians gather every Saturday afternoon to jam. As I walked in, a stately gentlemen farmer, named Stan, (as I found out later) said hello and asked if! were writing an article about Pendleton. He had seen me taking pictures earlier at the Hamley steak house and thought that might be the case. I said no and explained that I was on a journey, weathered in and found the town intriguing. But perhaps writing an article might be a good idea. I located Karen and I invited Stan to join us as well. Turns out that he is 79 and is a pilot as well. He also is the past chairman of the US Wheat Association and has traveled throughout the world. What next? Well of course, Bruce from the coffee shop, also joins us. Bruce and his wife Margaret have their own vintage antique business. He had contributed to renovation of the Hamley restaurant and in fact had built a large custom table for the wine cellar and reconstructed the antique bars. I learned that the main bar was moved to Pendleton from Grangeville Idaho and another bar in an upstairs party room was moved to Pendleton from Butte Montana. There is quite the story behind that move-but you’ll have to travel to Pendleton and meet Bruce for that detail. Bruce is currently constructing two loft apartments in an historic building around the corner and invited us to tour the lofts the next morning. Karen has lived in Pendleton forever and epitomizes the lovely nature of the citizens of the town. We all met for breakfast the next morning, prior to my departure. Stan helped me PreFlight—he wanted to make sure that I was thorough; he is also a CFI. I didn’t skip one step. When the frost melted I continued my journey home and couldn’t help but think that I must return to Pendleton and check out the famed Roundup and visit with my new friends....

The Utah  (Contest Entry #4)

The Utah (Contest Entry #4)

THE UTAH by Bill Tracy The Lycoming comes to life as the sun makes its first showing over the distant mountains. The red landscape glows with beauty as the sun rises higher on another timeless morning over the Utah desert. As we fly across above the landscape below we pick out the remains of adobe cliff dwellings. From a time when the Anasazi lived here. Many people have tried to live here but the desert always wins. Following the San Juan River westward, the towering sandstone buttes of Monument Valley   start to dance on the horizon in the shimmering sun. We take a new heading bringing us to the heart of giant columns. As they reach far above our flight path we realize just how insignificant we are. A landscape so huge. 80,000 square miles of a land so barren that even the devil won’t claim it. Yet so beautiful that it could be heaven.  Each time you come around another sandstone spire you get the feeling that John Wayne or Henry Fonda should  be riding out from behind the next one. But all that remains from the old movie sets are a few lonely sheep that are trying to find a blade of grass to eat. Continuing on to the west till we crest one more ridge to find Lake Powell. The Colorado River looks so slow and harmless as it’s confined in the canyon walls. Yet in days ahead we will see the power of its erosion as it cuts thru the rock. Following the waterway to the north watching to boaters beneath us trapped to the narrow sliver of water as we are free to head about any places we want. Drifting on to the north we come to a mile long strip of concrete, the welcome sight of Cal Black. A mile long strip of cement rolled out across the desert. But as you taxi in the sage brush crowds the edge of the runway. The tumbleweeds push against the fence as the desert tries to reclaim what it has lost. Shutting down are engines a dog comes loping out from under the weathered trailer that makes do as the FBO office to greet us. Soon followed by the airport attendant on the golf cart. Letting us know that both fuel and water are available. With gas tanks and water bottles full we turn back to the east to the mountain know as Nokai Dome. A dirt strip on a high plateau. With a view in all directions it makes you feel like you are at the top of the world. As it’s late in the afternoon it’s the place that we will set up camp. Along the edge of the runway is the remains of an old camp fire. But in these rugged surroundings it’s hard to say if it was from last week or a 100 years ago. The twisted gnarly trees show just how hard it is to survive in a place where time seems to of stopped. Or maybe the fire was from the last visitor that was here only to never be heard of again. With only his rusted jeep left as a reminder that someone was here. But as you look around and see that there is great beauty hidden among the harsh old trees that have weathered the time. From the end of the runway you can sit on the natural rock bench you can see for 100’s of miles. Not a car or person in sight. Sitting here on this ledge watching the sun go down over the distant mountain you realize that this is truly freedom that can only be found with and airplane. Waking the next morning before dawn we grab the jet boil and head for the rock bench to drink coffee and watch the sunrise as we contemplate where our journey will take us on this new day. With our camping gear packed away we head of to the north in search of the Dirty Devil.  Finding the Dirty Devil at Hite we head on north. Following it to Happy Canyon. Any place called happy in area like this deserves further investigation.  As you fly among these canyons there is a beauty that you either love or hate. If you are still following the river after the first day then the mystical power has already drawn you in. High on a bench above the Happy Canyon River there is an old tattered windsock and a weathered prospector shack that was withstood the time better than those who built it.  To look around and find this shack you almost have to wonder if soon the owner will come riding back in on his mule with his pick and shovel in hand. But looking and seeing the rusted soup cans and the half buried core sample bits you know one is returning other than maybe a few ghosts. As you dig thru the remains of life out behind this old shack, you find a few old engine parts and more tools from when someone hoped to strike it rich here. But now the shifting sands are slowing covering this mummified place. As we depart you have to wonder what story some archeologist will tell when they rediscover this place in a few 1000 years. Continuing to the north you get the feeling that the world has been turned on end as you come to the San Rafael Swell, or maybe you have flown in to the house of mirrors and its all an illusion.  Whatever it is there is no mistaking the layers of sandstone that have been uplifted and pointed to the sky. But its an area where many legends were born. Louis L’Amour wrote about it in a few books. Other Legends say that this was the hang out of Butch Casidy & the Sundance kid. Even flying over it you go for miles and see no visible way to transverse this wall. What a way to be caught after your great bank robbery you sneak out to the desert only to come upon this wall. The San Rafael River does cut thru the wall in a narrow slot that can be navigated with a strong will to escape and a sure footed horse. Just maybe this was Butch Casidy escape route.  On the other side we are taken even further back in time as we stop at Mexican Mountain. A sandy airstrip cut out of the mountainside by the river. Scattered driftwood and piles of sand remind us of the power this sleepy river can have in its flood stages. Hiking among the scattered boulders we are told a story of a people that was here even before the Anasazi. We find their story is painted on the rocks, as we try to decipher the petroglyphs. With what appears to be a warm welcome we make our camp here. Tents set up on sand so soft that it is better than any mattress.  Piles of drift wood liter the rings area. Delivered here from the great floods of an earlier date. A fire pit that might date back to the time of the people that painted the welcome greeting to us on the massive rock. As the sun sets over the ridgeline we are left in a warm glow. A feeling that someone is watching over us. As we sit around the campfire with a sky so clear that every star is visible. Maybe each star has a tale to tell as we sleep here tonight. If you want to hear the stories that the spirits of the old ones will deliver or sleep among the haunts of Butch Cassidy then you will have to leave the traffic patter behind and make the journey. Remember, it’s the Journey not the destination! To vote for Bill, “Like” on Facebook!...

Seaplanes with Anne & Kelly

Seaplanes with Anne & Kelly

Thanks to Anne Wright for sending her recent “splash time” pilot(s) update! Love it Anne!! Kelly Rinne and I went up to Northwoods Aviation in Cadillac, Michigan on Sept. 16 to fly seaplanes. It was Kelly’s first time, and a refresher for me. I had earned my SES at Jack Brown’s in Florida in 2009, but hadn’t flown seaplanes since then, so we were both looking forward to getting some splash time. Kelly and I had met at the reopening of a local airport that had been closed for a few years; it had belonged to Tecumseh Products and was private, but had been purchased by friends of mine from the Michigan Stearman Club, Dan and Janet Mills. Here is Kelly, me, and fellow LLT Linda Betzoldt on the ramp of the renamed Tecumseh Mills Airport. The weather at home was unflyable, with early fog and rain, so we decided to drive. Halfway northbound, the sky cleared up and we had a beautiful day! We arrived at Northwoods, and ate lunch while we talked with Jerry, our instructor. We then drove out to Sapphire Lake, where the Supercub on straight floats was docked in front of a small cabin. I went first, and we reviewed taxi and turning techniques, then took off for a larger lake right next to Sapphire. It was just a little breezy, so no glassy water techniques, but we did quite a few normal takeoffs and landings, and simulated the glassy water landings. Then over to another, much smaller lake, for some short “field” practice, and back to Sapphire, where Kelly was waiting for her turn. Kelly lives on a lake, and I wouldn’t be surprised if she ended up with a seaplane! Kelly taxiing back after her first seaplane lesson: We had a wonderful day, ending with geocaching in a local park, then a delicious dinner at Lakeside Charlie’s in Cadillac, and great conversation on the way home. Now we’re looking forward to flying that same Supercub this winter, when it changes into a skiplane. C’mon, snow!! Anne Wright...

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