And the LLT 2019 Scholarship Winners Are…..

And the LLT 2019 Scholarship Winners Are…..

The list of LadiesLoveTaildraggers’ scholarship winners took a giant leap forward in 2019. This year we’re awarding an incredible 12 scholarships, amazingly twice as many as last year! As you know, the mission of our organization is to encourage more women to fly taildraggers and that’s exactly what we’ve focused this year’s scholarships around. We also want to encourage top-notch taildragger flying so advanced training scholarships have also been awarded. Here’s how it shakes out. 10 Scholarships went to well deserving lady pilots who will be earning their Tailwheel Endorsements in 2019 2 Scholarships went to existing lady taildragger pilots who will be receiving advanced flight training very soon A Special Thank You None of this would have been possible without the selfless volunteerism by several CFIs across the country and the unwavering support of individuals who donated to our 2018 GoFundMe Scholarship campaign. Our new Approach We changed things up this year with an entirely new approach to our scholarship program. After we announced we were looking for women CFIs willing to donate their instruction time, and if possible, their aircraft to help other woman pilots, the door cracked open. Those conversations led to women CFIs volunteering themselves and sometimes an aircraft. Although it was a little more complicated, this maximized the number of women we could support. We used our scholarship fund to cover the discounted aircraft rental, hugely discounted flight training, and travel expenses for scholarship winners as necessary. Unfortunately, due to proximity of applicants vs CFIs, and reasonably priced aircraft rental, not all CFIs could be utilized. This new system isn’t perfect, but still 100% better than last year. With a little luck and more volunteer CFIs, we can take this program even further next year. Tailwheel Endorsement Scholarship Recipients and Their Instructors Instructor: Dianne Wieman Instructor Dianne Wieman donated her time and her aircraft, a 7AC Champ, to train two women pilots. Dianne is based at 1TE4, Zuehl Field, San Antonio, TX and is a CFII, ASEL with a CFIG (glider) rating and an A&P/IA. Dianne will be instructing 2 Pilots: Pilot Samantha Bledsoe, Charleston, SC will train with Dianne Wieman in San Antonio, TX. Samantha is 20 years old,  a college student and assistant manager at Clean Juice Calhoun. “I believe that my dedication to aviation is what sets me apart from other scholarship applications. I am driven, so when I set a goal for myself I will do everything in my power to achieve it. My days start at 5:30 am, and do not end until 9 at night. These days are filled with work, classes, studying for aviation-related subjects, volunteering, and flying when I have the money.” Pilot Anna Rusinowski, Etobicoke, Ontario, Canada will train with Dianne Wieman in San Antonio, TX. Anna is 30 years old and is an Allocation Analyst at TJX Canada. “My long term goal is to become a flight instructor and I am currently working towards the completion of my CPL Ground school. I am an activist for women in aviation and hope to share my passion with others throughout my journey.” Instructor: Laura Stants Instructor Laura Stants donated her time and arranged for a deeply discount hourly rate in the Aeronca Champ she’ll use for instructon. Laura is based at a grass strip near Kokomo, Indiana, Glenndale, 8I3, and is a corporate pilot and CFI/CFII/MEI who gives tailwheel instruction in a variety of aircraft including the T-6. Laura will be instructing one pilot: Pilot Amy Hills, Avon, Indiana will train with Laura Stants, Kokomo, IN. Amy is 34 years old and currently working toward becoming a CFI/CFII. “A tailwheel endorsement will change my flying for the better. It will vastly improve my stick and rudder skills, and give me a great understanding of the history of aviation and allow me to move forward in my ultimate goal of becoming a CFI – I want to teach all manner of single engine planes, including tailwheel.” Instructor: Christine Mortine Instructor Christine Mortine donated her time and aircraft and will be instructing in her C140 at KOSU, Ohio State University Airport, Columbus, Ohio. Christine is a musician and former professor who is now a full time flight instructor and a MEI with a SIC Citation 500 rating. Christine will be instructing one pilot: Pilot Delaney Johnston, Chicago, IL will train with Christine Mortine, Columbus, OH. Delaney is 23 years old and an Environmental Planner at Ricondo & Associates, Inc. “As a young child, I was transfixed by old photos of my grandpa during his time as a pilot in World War II. I grew fascinated with flying, and by the age of 17, I was up in the air where I belong. Although my initial interest was sparked by my grandpa, it developed into a full-blown aviation obsession throughout my teens and late 20s due to feelings of liberation and pride every time I stepped into an airplane. The confidence, diligence, and sense of adventure I’ve gained from piloting an airplane has translated to many aspects of my life. Exciting cross countries out west, day trips to nearby towns, and introducing the world of aviation to my friends has solidified my passion, and I cannot wait to develop more skills in my future training.” Instructor: Carol Walker Instructor Carol Walker, owner of Big Q Aviation, Midlothian, TX, will be training two ladies in her 1940 J-3 Cub at Mid-Way Regional Airport, JWY, and has discounted her standard rate to make these scholarships available. Carol is a full-time flight instructor who teaches exclusively in tailwheel airplanes and gliders and flies J-3 Cubs to adrenaline-soaked Pitts S2-Bs and anything in between. Carol will be instructing 2 pilots: Pilot Nicole Lund, Omaha, NB will train with Carol Walker, Dallas, TX. Nicole is 20 years old and currently works three jobs to pay for her college degree and flight training; TAC Air- Customer Service Representative, Frontier Airlines- Gate/Ramp Agent, and NASA- Student Worker for Nebraska Space Grant Program. “I fell in love with aviation the first time I went to a military air show when I was five years old and knew I wanted to be a pilot. My parents told me that if I ever wanted to get my pilot’s license, I would have to pay for it myself. I began walking cornfields at thirteen years old and continued to detassel corn the following nine years. I put every penny I made into a savings account that I did not touch until I began my private pilot training as a Freshman in college.” Pilot Emma Redfearn, Alisa Craig, Ontario, Canada will train with Carol Walker, Dallas, TX. Emma is a 21 year old college student. “As an officer in the Canadian Reserves working with the Air Cadets I work with youth between 12 and 19. Part of the mandate of Air Cadets is to provide youth with opportunities in aviation. As an officer with the cadets, I have the opportunity to act as a tow pilot for gliders which fly exclusively taildraggers. I would be able to give back to the aviation community and provide young people with the chance to fly.” Instructor: Sarah Rovner Instructor Sarah Rovner donated her time and her aircraft, a Supercub, to train two women pilots. Sarah is a CFI/CFII and flies for United Airlines.  She is also founder & CEO of Full Throttle Aviation, a company that offers ferry pilot services and aircraft delivery. Sarah will be instructing 2 pilots: Pilot Katelyn Ebdon, Pasadena, TX will train with Sarah Rovner, Philadelphia, PA. Katelyn is a high school senior who will be 18 this spring. “As a H.S. senior I spent all of my savings on my private pilot certificate so that I will save a year’s worth of tuition at ERAU. I was able to obtain my PPL, complex, high performance, and began working on my tailwheel endorsement while working at Texas Aviation Academy this summer, but now that I have taken out 2 college loans my mom prefers me to pursue paying for college, and not additional endorsements. My family is unable to financially support my aviation endeavors.” Pilot Kaitlyn Ciomperlik, College Station, TX will train with Sarah Rovner, Philadelphia, PA. Kaitlyn is 23 years old and Director of Customer Relations at Brazos Valley Flight Services. “You know that flying is a passion when the highlight of a vacation is not the actual vacation itself but the flight to and from your destination. As I earn hours towards my Commercial minimums and eventually work towards my CFI rating, I would love to continue my training in tailwheel aircraft so I can be one of very few tailwheel instructors at the flight school I am employed at.” Instructor: Lisa Martin Instructor Lisa Martin is temporarily based at Mesa, Arizona, Falcon Field, instructing full-time through March. Lisa is a CFII and Flight Instructor and A&P at Classic Air Aviation, Tour Pilot at Brooks Seaplane Service and Co-Owner at Coeur d’Alene Seaplanes. Lisa will be instructing one pilot: Pilot Stephanie Frazier, Chandler, AZ will train with Lisa Martin, Phoenix, AZ. Stephanie is 25 years old and a flight attendant. “Since my first flight in a 1943 Piper J3 Cub I have been in love with tailwheel planes. I strongly believe, as many others do, that flying tailwheel builds important stick and rudder skills, making for a better pilot. My goal is to build up my tailwheel time and skills once I get my endorsement and commercial certificate with a job flying tailwheel planes by banner towing or dropping skydivers. I plan on pursuing aerobatics once I reach my goal of becoming a commercial pilot as well.” Instructor: Brian Lansburgh Instructor Brian Lansburgh, CFI from Tailwheel Town, Sisters Airport, Oregon has happily agreed to return to the Ladies Love Taildraggers’ scholarship program.  Brian returns with both a new airplane and a new training syllabus. Training is now being done in a Piper PA12 “Super Cruiser” with an 0-320 engine.  Brian says the new trainer is one that Piper only built for a couple of years and which is simply a three-place Super Cub. Equipped with ADS-B, the new Super Cruiser is a great tailwheel and back country bush trainer. Brian’s precision airmanship flight training methods have made him a leader in the world of tailwheel flying. Those who win a scholarship to Brian’s “Tailwheel Town” will receive a ten-hour course, rather than a six-hour course. The flying at Tailwheel Town is quite varied and students may choose to get experience in Mountain Flying, Bush Flying, One-wheel work and Spins, with attention paid to “G” force, one wheel work and unusual attitude recovery.  Attention will be paid to each applicant’s comfort and no one will be expected to undergo anything but fun flying and some applicant’s will even have a chance to test their accuracy in the famous Duck Box Crash! Brian will be instructing two pilots, one Tailwheel Endorsement and one Advanced Training scholarship winner: Pilot Kendra Hart, Phoenix, AZ will train with Brian Lansburgh, Sisters, OR. Kendra is 24 years old and a remote agent at Aira Tech Corp. “As a military spouse, my need for any additional endorsements and ratings is critical as I move around the country applying for jobs at each new station. I am also resilient and dedicated, relentless in pursuing aviation! After marrying my husband and in the middle of my commercial training, we moved to a rural area in Texas where flight training was not available but I knew it was a matter of when – not if, I would finish my commercial rating. While we were there, I found a flight school that was an hour and a half drive each way and I made the drive five days a week to do a CFI ground class and move closer to finishing my commercial training.” Advanced Training for existing Tailwheel Pilots a.k.a. Name Your Own Scholarship Advanced Training Instructor: Lynn Gardner Instructor Lynn Gardner is a professional corporate pilot, CFI/ CFII and back-country pilot with an emphasis on off-field/hostile environment emergency landings. She is also an experimental aircraft builder and has completed two Just Aircraft Highlanders and a Rans S7. Lynn will be instructing one pilot: Pilot Karen Ewart, Fayetteville, NC will train with Lynn Gardner, in north-central FL. Karen is a 53 year old stay at home mom with CFI and CFII ratings. “I want to review basic flight maneuvers, especially stalls and unusual attitude recovery and then move on to refining my short field and spot landing techniques.” Karen’s goal as a CFII who has not instructed in many years, is to get back into active flight instruction. Advanced Training Instructor: Brian Lansburgh Instructor Brian Lansburgh  returns to LadiesLoveTaildraggers and will be training in a Piper PA12 “Super Cruiser” with an 0-320 engine and a great tailwheel and back country bush trainer. New scholarship winners will get the chance to practice landings in a turn, Dead Stick Landings and spins, among other innovative training maneuvers.  Those who win a scholarship to Brian’s “Tailwheel Town” will receive a ten-hour course, rather than a six-hour course and will soon be looking down their noses at those who are graduates of what Brian refers to as “Acme” flying schools. The flying at Tailwheel Town is quite varied and students may choose to get experience in Mountain Flying, Bush Flying, One-wheel work and Spins, with attention paid to “G” force, one wheel work and unusual attitude recovery.  Attention will be paid to applicant’s comfort and no one will be expected to undergo anything but fun flying and some applicant’s will even have a chance to test their accuracy in the famous Duck Box Crash! Brian will be instructing: Pilot Christie Osburn, Kotzebue, AK will train with Brian Lansburgh, Sisters, OR. Christie is a 30 year old wildlife biologist. “I live and work in northwestern Alaska where roads barely exist and access in and out of communities is limited to travel by air, boat or snow machine. Aviation is the lifeblood of these small, rural villages. My aviation goal is to be a pilot-biologist and my goal is within reach; however, many more hours of training and experience will be necessary to conduct research flights both safely and effectively. Many wildlife survey are flown at low airspeeds and low altitudes where safety margins are slim. Having upset recovery training would not only help prevent upset conditions in the first place but also provide for efficient reactions in situations when time and altitude are limited. Pilot-biologists are routinely flying in new terrain and variable conditions; adaptability and an intimate knowledge of the functionality of the aircraft (and one’s self) are essential for the safety of pilot and observers.”...

Fiona’s 24 Turn Spin Video

Fiona’s 24 Turn Spin Video

Yep, they videoed themselves doing a whopping 24 turn spin, including recovery revolutions; two ladies brought together by a LadiesLoveTaildraggers Spin Training scholarship. I’m still blown away by Catherine Cavagnaro who donated not only her time as the CFII, but donated her aircraft as well to provide this scholarship. British scholarship winner Fiona Macaskill was the lucky recipient who made her way from Olvestoon, UK all the way to Tennessee to fulfill the scholarship. Fiona posted the YouTube video and reported “One more Ace Aerobatic Spin Training is in the books! Thank you to Catherine Cavagnaro and to Ladies Love Taildraggers …. Here is my graduation 24-turn spin!” Many thanks to Fiona for writing the following article detailing her former flying experience and what spin training with Catherine is all about. Travelling from England to Tennessee to do a spin course was a dream come true. When LadiesLoveTaildraggers awarded me the scholarship for the advanced spin course with Catherine Cavagnaro I was thrilled and immediately started to plan the trip. My husband, Angus, who is also a pilot, wanted to come with me and if possible, pay to do the same course if time permitted. As it turned out, the weather and time only allowed me to complete the practical side of the course but we both did the theoretical element together which was really helpful. I have always enjoyed taking on challenges. In one of my former lives I flew paragliders (without an engine), competed all over the world, logged 2,000 hours & got four FAI world paraglider records. So, having learnt to fly flying a light aircraft five years ago and now logged 700 hours I thought itworth applying for a scholarship as learning to spin (and get out of a spin) seemed like a very good idea. I was very grateful and excited to be awarded the scholarship and found the whole experience very worthwhile. The course took place over two half days: this was due to inclement weather but proved better than doing everything in one day. Catherine gave two very well-prepared lectures, covering the principles of flight, stalls & spins. Although I already knew about these things in theory (you can’t get your PPL if you don’t) her delivery of the principles made it all very clear and easy to understand. For me, getting into a spin was probably harder than getting out of one: almost all my training to date has been about how to avoid stalling and spinning. It was difficult to go against my basic survival instincts to pull the aircraft into a stall & then deliberately spin. Once the spin was established, closing the throttle, applying pressure on the rudder in the opposite direction to the turn and pushing the nose down soon arrested the rotation and brought ‘Wilbur’, Catherine’s C152A, into a nose down attitude without any rotation. Once this is established and you are heading straight for the ground, all one needs to do is pull the nose up and control the speed with the throttle. It sounds quite easy when described. When you add disorientation, looking at all the instruments, the ‘fear’ factor and G force when pulling out (the actual spin is only 1 G but the pull out can be 3 G) it becomes somewhat more challenging! The first flight was a familiarization exercise followed by a few uncontrolled stalls practicing skidding & slipping & some two turn spins. The aircraft handled well and easily recovered. Once the spin was established (after three turns) more input was required to recover so I practiced several of these and became comfortable doing so. We returned to base for a de-brief and to discuss the next flight: more 3 turn spins and then ‘the big one’… we climbed to 9,500 (8,500 feet above surface). I put the aircraft into the spin (‘easy’!), held it and Catherine started counting 1… 2 …… 19… 20 … Though not at all disorientated, it felt like the ground was coming up fast and that it was time to pull out. I applied all my new-found skills and it pulled out easily. Once flying straight & level I saw the altimeter was at 4,000 ft – we had plenty of spare height after all. The sun was setting, my heart was beating a little faster than usual and it was time to return to Sewanee. The whole one-week trip was very memorable: our host, Sharon Tinkler, (who lives on an air park next to Tullahoma regional airport, TN) was very generous with her time and hospitality. It was fascinating to share our different cultures and perceptions & see the region. I am most grateful to Ladies Love Taildraggers & Judy Bircher for enabling the training & thoroughly recommend other ladies to stretch themselves and extend their flying in areas they have not yet ‘got around to’. Thank you, again to Judy, Catherine and Sharon – you are all STARS! Many thanks to Sharon Tinkler for hosting the Macaskill’s during their Tennessee USA stay and of course to Catherine Cavagnaro for making it all possible....

Apply NOW for a 2019 LadiesLoveTaildraggers Scholarship!

Apply NOW for a 2019 LadiesLoveTaildraggers Scholarship!

Apply TODAY for a 2019 Ladies Love Taildraggers Scholarship!  In 2019, I hope to award more scholarships than ever before. Thanks to the generosity of individuals who donated to our Scholarship Fund and volunteer CFIs, we will stretch our dollars and help even more women achieve their aviation goals. I’m very excited this year our scholarships will be targeting applicants’ specific requests: – Tailwheel Endorsement. Would you like a Tailwheel Endorsement – we’ve got you covered. – Advanced Training. Would you like advanced tailwheel training like STOL, Mountain Flying, Aerobatics, Spin or Upset training? We’ve got you covered. Or struggling with basics like landing at grass strips, crosswind landings or communicating at controlled fields? This is your chance to ask for help. Applicant Requirements -Must be female -Must be a minimum 18 years of age by May 1, 2019 -Must hold a minimum of Sport Pilot certificate -Must write a short post about your training experience for LadiesLoveTaildraggers Online applications are due by midnight February 28, 2019 and the scholarship winners will be announced no later than April 15, 2019. Winning applicants must complete flight instruction by October 31, 2019 or scholarship is void. The women in this slide show are some of the CFIs who have volunteered to assist with training our scholarship winners. Several are donating their instruction time AND their aircraft, others a deeply discounted training package or instruction time. 2019 is going to be a great year for many deserving lady pilots. Why not YOU?!! Applicants much choose one of two application forms; those without a tailwheel endorsement choose #1, all others choose #2.  Tailwheel Endorsement Scholarship Application Form  Name Your Own Scholarship  Advanced Training Application Form #1 Tailwheel Endorsement Scholarships are open to all female pilots. Flight instruction and a limited travel allowance will be included in each scholarship awarded. All flight training will be administered by women taildragger CFIs. These ladies support our mission of empowering women to live their dream of flying a taildragger and increase their flying skills. There are a number of women CFIs who have volunteered to do flight training, some also donating the use of their aircraft. I welcome more women CFIs to step forward to help train our scholarship winners. In some cases, funding for aircraft rental and instructors will come from LadiesLoveTaildraggers’ scholarship donations. In all cases, travel expenses will be paid from our Scholarship Fund.  To Apply:  Tailwheel Endorsement Scholarship Application Form #2 The Name Your Own Advanced Training scholarships are brand new this year and available to any female taildragger pilot including LadiesLoveTaildraggers’ members. The “Name Your Own Scholarship” targets applicants’ individual flying skills and aims to provide additional flight training as needed. This is your opportunity to think outside the box and ask for tailwheel training as you see fit. Tell me your goals and what you need to achieve them; Spin-training, STOL training, Mountain Flying, Aerobatics, Upset training and more. Having trouble mastering grass strips or hesitate landing at controlled fields? Here’s your chance. Tell me what and tell me why and you’re half way there. Flight instruction and a limited travel allowance will be included in each scholarship awarded. For the first time, we are offering a way to design your own scholarship. Whether you are chosen depends on your ability to convey your strengths and pinpoint the flying skill(s) you would like to improve. You’ll be asked a variety of questions followed by an opportunity to write your own scholarship; i.e. how LadiesLoveTaildraggers can help you achieve your aviation goals. As noted, a number of women CFIs have volunteered to do flight training, some also donating the use of their aircraft. I welcome more women CFIs to step forward to help train our scholarship winners. In some cases, funding for aircraft rental and instructors will come from LadiesLoveTaildraggers’ scholarship donations. In all cases, travel expenses will be paid from our Scholarship Fund.  To Apply: Name Your Own Scholarship...

The inside “spin” on Emergency Maneuver Training with Jeanne MacPherson

The inside “spin” on Emergency Maneuver Training with Jeanne MacPherson

Many thanks to 2018 LadiesLoveTaildraggers scholarship winner Shalyn Marchetti for detailing beautifully what Emergency Maneuver Training with Jeanne MacPherson is all about. Jeanne operates Mountain AirDance, Helena, Montana, and is a past ‘Montana Pilot of the Year’, flies a King Air 90 for the State of Montana, and holds Commercial, CFII, SEL, MEL, and SES ratings. She specializes in mountain flying, Rich Stowell’s Stall/Spin training and EMT (Emergency Maneuver Training), tailwheel endorsements, and basic aerobatics. Read on for Shalyn ‘s excellent account of EMT training with Jeanne. I’d like to begin by saying a huge thank you to Ladies Love Taildraggers, to Jeanne MacPherson, Judy Birchler, and anyone who donated to the scholarship funds. The Emergency Maneuver Training I received with Jeanne and Mountain AirDance was such a privilege and I am extremely grateful to have been given this opportunity. Not only do I feel like I became a better pilot as a result of this course, I now have yet another amazing woman pilot to look up to. The trip began on a Friday morning, catching a flight to Los Angeles for my connection to Salt Lake City and then ultimately Helena. My layover in L.A. was quite long, and while there I began to worry about my cell phone battery dying. Eventually I decided to find an airport store that sold phone chargers. As I was walking into one such store, a young woman caught my eye. Anyone who knows me well knows that Grey’s Anatomy is sort of my vice. I have long been a fan of the show, and now… standing in front of me was Camilla Luddington, also known as Dr. Jo Wilson on Grey’s Anatomy! I know while in L.A. you’re not supposed to approach the actors/actresses, however, I couldn’t really help myself. I sort of word vomited at her what a big fan I was. The most interesting thing to me was how quickly she changed accents! She’s originally British, but now works in the U.S., and she changed between the accents effortlessly. I knew meeting her was the beginning of a wonderful trip. When I arrived in Helena, I was greeted by Jeanne, who had offered to pick me up, as well as stay with her and her husband Bill for my weekend in Montana. Jeanne has an absolutely beautiful house in a beautiful location; living in Phoenix for the last year, I was in LOVE with all the green around her house. We went and grabbed a yummy dinner at a local restaurant to celebrate Bill passing his seaplane checkride earlier that day. The next morning we went for our first flight. I had never flown a Super Decathlon before, but now, it’s one of my dream planes to own. We began with the basics, Dutch Rolls. Having just completed my ATP/CTP course, I had been taught exactly how dangerous Dutch Rolls can become (there are some pretty gnarly YouTube videos), but after some work with Jeanne, I felt that I gained a much better understanding of them, and feel comfortable executing and recovering from Dutch Rolls, in all sorts of manners. We also worked on what is most pilots’ worst nightmares: a primary control failure. We started off that day working on a rudder failure. Slipping is the name of the game here, and because of Jeanne, I now feel somewhat confident that even if this happens to me, I have a much better chance of surviving. We also began working on spins that first flight. I have done spins several times previously, yet I could never fully wrap my brain around them. As in, I understood how to get in and how to get out, but it just seemed as if it was all a blur. We did a few spins and then returned to the airport. That evening, we weren’t able to fly due to the wind. The next morning we headed out again. More Dutch rolls, this time both climbing and turning, and more spins. We also added aileron rolls to the mix. Some may ask, “Why aileron rolls? That’s an aerobatic maneuver, not an emergency maneuver.” Initially, that’s what I thought too. I was thrilled to do them, I just failed to grasp the point of it in Emergency Training. That is, until Jeanne had me read an excerpt from Sammy Mason’s book Faith & Flight, in which he talks about entering some extreme wake turbulence. All pilots are taught to avoid wake turbulence, that it spins out, around, and down, but not what to do in the case that you cannot avoid it. After reading the excerpt from Sammy Mason, I came to understand that he had entered extreme wake turbulence that flipped him and his plane upside down, and a thorough understanding of the simple aileron roll helped save his life, as he was able to roll right side up again. We also worked on aileron failures during this flight. Slipping was still the name of the game. The last flight we had was later Sunday evening. We flew several more aileron rolls, with me finally able to perfect entering and exiting on the same heading. The time I finally nailed it, I was so unbelievably excited, I wanted to scream with joy. We did more spins, aggravated this time. By adding all the elements to aggravate a spin, I quickly learned why we P.A.R.E. out of them, and in that order. Not only that, but that last flight, through Jeanne’s amazing guidance, I was finally able to slow my brain down throughout the spin, to the point I was able to enter and exit all on the same heading, on PURPOSE! The next morning was fairly bittersweet, as I said goodbye to the Helena area and goodbye to Jeanne. I must say, if anyone is interested in any back country instruction, or Emergency Manuever Training, or Spin training, or even tailwheel training, I will always highly, highly recommend Jeanne. She is an absolutely phenomenal instructor, very calm, patient, and brilliant. Again, I would like to extend my deepest and sincerest thanks to Ladies Love Taildraggers. This was such an incredible opportunity, and I learned so much. Also, big thank you to Jeanne and Mountain AirDance for making this possible!...

Announcing the 2018 LadiesLoveTaildraggers’ Scholarship Winners!

Announcing the 2018 LadiesLoveTaildraggers’ Scholarship Winners!

I am thrilled to announce this year’s LadiesLoveTaildraggers’ Scholarship winners! SIX taildraggers scholarships, all made possible by your generous donations. Thank you from me, and thank you from these very happy ladies! Scholarship #1: Tailwheel Endorsement by Carol Walker of Big Q Aviation, Dallas, Texas Winner:  Ellen Robbins from Ferndale, Washington Present Employment: College Student, Part-time Nurses Assistant Commercial, Instrument Rated Pilot My goal is to use aviation overseas, supporting small, isolated communities via missionary aviation. The tailwheel endorsement will help me to be a better pilot all around, as well as a better instructor and a better missionary pilot eventually! Instructing is a big part of my aviation plan, using it both here in the US, and then overseas to train up a generation of indigenous pilots in places like Kenya (my target country). I also hope to do some instruction in Alaska where I have connections with multiple training facilities. Tailwheel instruction is a big part of their training programs. Not only is tailwheel flying a blast, but I’m really excited to use it to improve my overall flying skills. Scholarship #2: Tailwheel Endorsement Training with Debby Rihn-Harvey, Texas Winner: Summer Papple from Seaforth, Ontario, Canada Present Employment:  I am self-employed in our farming operation. My husband and I grow corn and soybeans, with cover crop rotation, and we dry our crops using our home-built wood-fired furnace. I am also self-employed in our new business, Papple Aviation, offering scenic flights, air taxi, crop scouting, and other similar services. I fill all roles in the business except Chief Pilot, which I will take over by this spring when I reach the required 500 hours. My husband and I are both self-employed farmers; with all the aviation training I’ve done in the past few years along with the expense of starting my own aviation business, and the related aircraft maintenance expenses to bring our 172K up to required commercial standards, our finances are stretched very thin. Commercial, Instrument Rated Pilot I’m always looking for opportunities to sharpen and improve my pilot skills and learning to fly tailwheel aircraft will be a great way to further fine-tune my skills while also opening possibilities in both my professional and personal flying. Having a tailwheel endorsement will make me a more versatile pilot and as I gain experience flying tailwheels there may be opportunities to expand my business to include tailwheel aircraft. I have aviation contacts in the spraying, cover crop seeding, and tree-seeding fields, all of which use tailwheel aircraft.  With tailwheel experience I could add a tailwheel aircraft to my business. There are tailwheel clubs within 100nm where I could gain further flying experience. I’ve joined the Fleet Canuck Flying Club, started through a neighbouring 99s chapter, and I had an introductory flight last spring. With a tailwheel endorsement and more experience in the Fleet Canuck I would be able to become a check pilot and introduce other women to the experience of flying taildraggers. One of my future plans is to learn to fly gliders, as I feel this would be a real asset to my skills as a powered aircraft pilot. The tow planes at nearby gliding clubs are taildraggers and with a tailwheel endorsement and additional experience I could also be involved in a glider club by flying the tow planes. Scholarship #3: Spin Training by Catherine Cavagnaro of Ace Aerobatic School  Tennessee Winner: Kimberly Kanapeckas, Charleston, South Carolina Present Employment: Assistant Scientist for SC Department of Natural Resources Private Pilot My studies in Africa required fixed-wing aircraft to access field sites and immobilize wildlife. Witnessing the pilots’ skills in these situations—identifying species, maneuvering in difficult areas and conditions, reading a herd’s behavior to position the aircraft properly—inspired and continues to motivate me along my career path as a pilot-biologist. Sound decision-making, safety, precision, and adaptability characterize the best wildlife survey pilots, and I see this frequently when I am a biologist on aerial surveys. Commonly I perform outreach as a biologist for aerial surveys. These surveys are typically flown below 400 feet with the stall horn constantly going off, so knowing how to instinctively recover from spins is invaluable to me when I shift roles to pilot (single pilot resource management). As a private pilot endorsed to fly tailwheel with over 180 hours total time (70+ hours tailwheel) and learning basic aerobatics and emergency maneuvers, my short-term goal is to achieve proficiency in advanced aerobatic techniques and spin training as I concurrently earn my commercial certificate to build the experience I’ll need as an eventual aerobatic and tailwheel flight instructor. My longer-term goal is to lead airborne research programs and teach tailwheel and aerobatics as an instructor. These funds will also help me learn techniques to teach spin endorsements as an instructor (long-term career benefit). Scholarship #4: Emergency Maneuver Training by Jeanne McPherson, Montana Winner:  Shalyn Applegate from Scottsdale, Arizona Present Employment: Flight Instructor Commercial, Instrument Rated Pilot, CFI, CFII, MEI My family. I’m a third generation pilot. I literally grew up on an airport. My earliest memories are in my father’s hangar, as he was polishing. However, when I was 17 years old, I met an incredible woman, Molly Littlefield. Molly is a captain for United Airlines, and watching her showed me that girls can do it too, and I began to pursue commercial aviation. As a flight instructor, I try to teach my students every skill they need to handle any situation they might encounter. This training would allow me to become better educated in Emergency Manuevers, and allow me to pass that knowledge onto my students. Being able to pass that knowledge down to my students and hopefully make them safer, would mean the world to me. I’m sure the other women who are applying for this scholarship are amazing, but that being said, this scholarship and the training wouldn’t just help me out, it would help my students out. Scholarship #5: Mountain Flying Course with Jennifer Watson, San Jose, California Winner: Melissa (Missy) Martin from Polaris, Montana Current Employment:  Montana Air National Guard  Instrument & Commercial Single & Multi Engine Land I recently completed C-130 training in Little Rock, Arkansas for the Montana Air National Guard. I am a part-time guardsman looking for a full time civilian flying job. At 34, I am starting my aviation career later than most. I have lived the last 19 months in my camper to save up for an airplane and my tailwheel endorsement, which I completed in January. I wanted to learn how to fly after watching the movie Apollo 13 at age 12. I grew up in the mining town of Butte, Montana and had zero exposure to aviation of any sort. Apollo 13 was my first introduction to the thought of a life outside of a small mining town. After cracking open my family’s World Book Encyclopedia set and reading everything I could about astronauts, I realized they were all pilots. I then started to research what it took to be a pilot and immediately fell in love with the idea of flying. My parents were not willing to let me take flight lessons so I didn’t have my first flight until college but I was hooked. Life took me on a different path over the next 16 years but I finally got back to my original dream. I have been extremely fortunate to complete my ratings over the past 2 years with the determination of a life-long aviation career ahead. Taking a mountain flying course is absolutely essential for my continued flying career in Montana. Montana provides a unique flying challenge with high altitude fields and mountainous terrain. In addition to starting a rural school aviation program, I would like to fly contract work for the Fish & Game conducting game counts. I am also a member of the Beaverhead Search and Rescue and would like to volunteer my skills as an airborne search platform. All of these flying goals require a very solid understanding of mountain flying of which I do not have. This course would be the foundation of my mountain flying skills, allowing me to be a safe and contributing member to aviation in the years to come. Scholarship #6: International Stinson Club’s Tailwheel Endorsement Scholarship, CFI of winner’s choice Winner: Danielle Maniere from Missoula, Montana Present Employment: Raft Guide / Substitute Teacher CSEL / CMEL / Instrument Rating After six years of working as an engineer, I was released during the economic downturn in 2015. I have since moved to Montana and returned to my initial passion for aviation and made it my next career goal. In the past two years, I have worked my way through Instrument, single and multi-commercial ratings. I am currently working on my CFI. I have been supporting myself through working as a white water rafting guide in the summer and a substitute teacher in the winter. My goal is to be a back country charter pilot in the mountains of Idaho and Montana. My ultimate goal in aviation is to become a back country pilot while I am currently working towards my CFI. I live in Montana and am an avid outdoors woman. Backcountry skiing, multi day white water rafting trips, and mountain biking have brought me to some very remote parts of the north west, often only accessible by small aircraft, pack horses, rafts or on foot. My soul is happiest when I am in the mountains and I am aiming to combine my love of flying with my love of the wilderness. I respect and understand the dangers and realize that a mastery of flying is an essential part to becoming a successful back country pilot. Learning vital mountain flying skills, emergency maneuvers, and getting my tailwheel endorsement I feel is essential to my future as a successful back country pilot as well as a CFI.  ...