Dianna Ingram (Illinois)

Diana is based at Yorkville, IL I currently fly Learjets and King Airs for an air ambulance company but for fun I rent a Decathlon, although I’m taking a break currently to save up for a Pitts that I can use in competition.  I have a lot of time in a Stearman, Piper Cub and various Cessna taildraggers. Pictures pending 9/25/09...

Rachel Aukes     (Iowa)

Rachel Aukes (Iowa)

Rachel lives in Des Moines, Iowa and is based at AMW. I’m a new pilot (well under 100 hours yet) and have just started working on getting my first rating – a tailwheel endorsement.  I fly a 1943 Stearman PT-13 (Army colors). I fly whenever I get the chance, which is never enough. I’ve been lucky enough to fly and catch rides in a variety of birds, and I’ve even started a website to track my – and my husband’s – adventures www.halffastadventures.com. I love fly-ins of any kind… from small potlucks to OSH.  And in early September I make my annual pilgrammage to Blakesburg, Iowa, for the national antique airplane fly-in and then to Galesburg, Illinois for the national Stearman fly-in....

Diana Votaw     (Missouri)

Diana Votaw (Missouri)

“I am 53 years old born 06-15-60, got my PPL when I was 17 and my CFI at 19.  Master’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering.  Own and operate my own airplane (Cubcrafters Sport Cub S2) and airplane business.  I Love to take pictures and I’m trying to get better at aerial video!  Have three children and my oldest daughter, Julia, has her PPL and flies taildraggers when she can.” Diana is based at Creve Couer (1HO), St. Louis.     Here’s a link to Diana’s website: http://votawaviation.com/ This one is a new light sport aircraft site she’s trying to get going: http://lsaircraft.org/...

Kim Pardon     (Kansas)

Kim Pardon (Kansas)

Kim Pardon flies an L-19 Bird Dog and is based at Gardner Municipal Airport, Gardner, Kansas (Identifier K34). Kim tells us “I learned to fly a few years ago in a Citabria.  I now fly an L-19 Bird Dog  …. a Vietnam era liaison airplane similar in many ways to a Cessna 170.  I’m based at Gardner Municipal Airport – the best little airport in Kansas”....

Diana Richards     (Missouri)

Diana Richards (Missouri)

Diana Richards keeps Citabria N4216Y at the private grass farm strip she and her husband, Tom, share in southwest Missouri, Identifier O8MO.  Rumor says her favorite airplane is named “Citabriaberry”!  Diana flies aerobatics and competes in her “beloved” Citabria.  Check out a few of her pictures from the POA website and links she has provided. Diana tells me her first lesson was in a Champ when she was 13 years old. “When I flew around the country for a month, two years ago, I landed on mostly grass strips, and two of my favorite were grass strips in Indiana.  I enjoyed spending the night in that adorable little cabin at Lee Bottom.” For a wonderful article  written by Diana’s 12 year old niece, Elizabeth Triplett, and published in the February 2008 issue of IAC Sport Aerobatics Magazine click on the following PDF file.  How appropriate the title “My Aunt is a “roll model”! drichardsflying-free_roll-model And from an email from Diana: There’s a link on PoA about my month long, grass fields tour and photos as my trip progressed.  It was a wonderful trip.  I’m trying to be more disciplined about writing a book about it, and am halfway done now. http://www.pilotsofamerica.com/forum/showthread.php?t=13828 I wrote three article for Sport Aerobatics, but am really more excited about my niece getting her article in the magazine…she is a bright young woman and will  hopefully be able to take flying lessons some day. You can click on the following AOPA site and see an article written about Diana: http://flighttraining.aopa.org/members/ft_magazine/archives/article.cfm?article=7430 AOPA sent a professional photographer to the farm, and the fun part was taking him for his first aerobatic ride when we were through with the photo session.  He is 6′ 6” and we had a time getting him into the Citabria with a parachute on. LOL  It finally worked out and we had a fun flight that day and he even posted a few videos on You Tube that he took with his little camera. Here is a link to an EAA article that talks about Young Eagle Flight Leaders and has some photos that I submitted to go along with the interview I had with them: http://www.pilotsofamerica.com/forum/showpost.php?p=441104&postcount=17...

Melissa Adams     (Iowa)

Melissa Adams (Iowa)

Melissa Adams, twin sister to Champ owner Melinda Adams, flies out of Lamoni, Iowa (LWD) and is also a tailwheel pilot....

Lori Adams     (Texas)

Lori Adams (Texas)

Lori Adams, 81, of  Smithville, Texas flies a 1967 Citabria and has logged 29,000 hours in 55 years.  She continues to fly aerobatics in Smithville. By Andrea Lorenz AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF The red-headed pilot takes precautions before she flies the 1967 single-engine Citabria she co-owns with friend and former student Austin Wambler. She checks the fuel and oil, gives the plane a once-over and never flies in bad weather, except for occasions like two weeks ago at the Smithville Municipal Airport Fly-In, when, despite looming clouds, she gave onlookers a show of airplane aerobatics. On a recent Sunday, she guided the plane in loops, spins and dives for onlookers, moves she’s done for so long they no longer thrill her, but people enjoy them so she continues them. Born the year Charles Lindbergh flew the Spirit of St. Louis in the first solo nonstop trans-Atlantic flight, Adams said she hesitates to share her age lest it deter passengers or students from flying with her. “They’ll see an old woman, and they’ll say, ‘I don’t want to fly with that old grandma.’ ” Bubbly and energetic, when Adams isn’t working her four days a week at Smithville’s Brookshire Brothers petrol station, she’s flying or at the airport. She’s called the Queen of the Airport Bums, according to the group of pilots and airplane aficionados who hang out at the Smithville airport, because she’s the only woman of the bunch. Adams spends many of her weekends there, where she and Wambler keep their plane in a hangar they also own. Sometimes they go for a “$100 hamburger,” pilot-speak for the cost of the fuel it takes to fly to another town for a burger. “This is where she comes into her own,” Wambler said as Adams took off for a solo flight to show off her aerobatic moves. “When she gets into an airplane, she goes into her own world.” Adams began flying in her early 20s, but her interest in aviation started when she was a child in Smithville. “I jumped from the hayloft into the hay,” she said. “I thought I wanted to fly.” In her teens, she tried to join the Women Airforce Service Pilots, who flew military aircraft during World War II, but she was too young. Adams finally had a chance to fly in a plane thanks to acquaintances. She worked as a photographer snapping pictures of patrons at a nightclub, and the band director took her up. Her roommate’s boyfriend gave Adams her first lessons in Dallas in exchange for paying her roommate’s share of the rent for a month: $50. The first time Adams flew alone, in a J-3 Cub, the control stick used to fly the plane from the back seat came off during the flight. She managed to land safely by climbing into the front seat, but the incident scared her. “I quit flying for about a year,” Adams said. “With the stick coming out, I thought the good Lord didn’t want me to fly.” She eventually got back in a plane, obtained her license and moved to Houston. She married Dick Adams along the way. He died in 1960 when his crop-dusting plane went down because it was overloaded. She never remarried. In 1964, Adams opened a flight school at Houston’s Hobby Airport, where she stayed until the 1980s when the airport became too congested to handle small planes. She then retired, returned to her hometown and started giving instructions in Smithville. Although she no longer teaches, with 29,000 flying hours, Adams doesn’t have plans to slow down. Federal Aviation Administration rules require commercial passenger pilots to retire by 65, but there’s no age limit for other pilots as long as they pass regular medical exams. Adams said she will fly “till I die.” “For real,” she said. “You’ll see it someday in the paper. You’ll say, ‘Oh, I knew her.’ But now I’m healthy and I feel good.” Adams said the only trouble she has getting around is caused by a pesky ankle injury she got skydiving; she jumped out of a plane two years ago and caught her foot on the way out — “a freak accident,” she said. And Adams wants another go at skydiving — without the broken ankle. “I want to make a good one,” she said. Citing former President George Bush’s skydiving trips in his 80s, she said, “It’s no big deal.”  —————————————————————————–  This picture of Lori Adams from 1966 was sent by Jerry Griggs, a former line boy for Lori.  (See Comments).  Lori taught Jerry to fly in 1967 and Jerry taught his daughter and her best friend to fly his Aeronca “K” when the girls were 16. They are featured on this website at Janice & Andrea\’s First Solos .  ...

Pat Wegner (Wisconsin)

Pat Wegner owns and flys a 108 h.p. 1948 Stinson Voyager with a  Franklin engine based in Milwaukee, WI.  Please see her story provided by our friend, Ray Johnson, from the 2008 Marion, Indiana Flyin Drivein. Bright House Networks, Inge Harte, speaks with lady taildragger pilots Pat Wegner & Marge Balaz about their flying activities.  Both of these lady taildragger pilots encourage other women to get into flying and aircraft ownership....

Melinda Hopper     (Missouri)

Melinda Hopper (Missouri)

Melinda  flies her 1946 C-65 Champ out of a grass strip in St. Joseph, MO and is pictured with her twin sister, Melissa Adams, also a tailwheel pilot. * My name is Melinda Hopper and I live at St. Joseph, Mo. I fly out of a lovely grass strip a few miles south of town, owned by a private individual. There are 14 hangars there, with mostly ultralights, and one or two homebuilts.I first fell in love with flying when I got on an airliner in October 1989 at the age of 37. A year later, a friend took me up in his Aeronca Champ, and then I WAS hooked!! I started saving my money, and a year after THAT, began flying lessons. (In the meantime, the friend was teaching me to fly the Champ, but he wasn’t an instructor, so I couldn’t log it.) I got my license in October 1992 at the age of 40, after training in a Cessna 172. I rented planes for several years, while saving up and looking for a Champ. I finally found one in 1998, bought it, and have had it for 10 years. It was rebuilt by the father of the friend who took me up for my first ride in his Champ. His Champ was also restored by his dad – his and mine were the last two of 16 planes his dad restored. My Champ is a 1946 model, manufactured in January that year. It’s a basic Champ with a 65-horsepower Continental and no electrical system. Yep, I have to use the old “Armstrong” starter! I have flown Cessna 172s and 150s, Piper Tomahawk, Cherokee, Warrior, Archer and Aztec – also a single-engine Piper retractable that I’ve forgotten the name of! I had some twin time and instrument training, but never got either rating. I did, however, get a limited commercial license in 2005. I have flown many places in my Champ (and rented planes before I got the Champ) – fly-ins and fly-in breakfasts in Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Missouri, trips to visit relatives and friends, and Oshkosh twice in the Champ and to Middletown, Ohio for the National Aeronca Convention....

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